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5 insider secrets to beating Taleo

Another very interesting article on applicant tracking systems, otherwise known as Taleo (and other terrible sounding software apps). Highlights include what an HR rep actually sees when you submit a resume through Taleo, and 5 tips on making sure your application isn’t rejected by the software.

Job seekers can increase their resumes’ chances of getting through an applicant tracking system by heeding the following do’s and dont’s:

1. Never send your resume as a PDF: Because applicant tracking systems lack a standard way to structure PDF documents, they’re easily misread, says Ciampi.

2. Don’t include tables or graphics: Applicant tracking systems can’t read graphics, and they misread tables. Instead of reading tables left to right, as a person would, applicant tracking systems read them up and down, says Ciampi.

3. Feel free to submit a longer resume: The length of your resume doesn’t matter to an applicant tracking system, says Ciampi. It will scan your resume regardless of whether it’s two pages or four. Submitting a longer (say three or four page) resume that allows you to pack in more relevant experience and keywords and phrases could increase your chances of ranking higher in the system.

4. Call your work experience, “Work Experience”: Sometimes job seekers refer to their work experience on their resume as their “Professional Experience” or “Career Achievements” (or some other variation on that theme). “People get very creative on their resume because they think it will help them stand out, but in fact it hurts them,” says Ciampi. “Often the computer will completely skip over your work experience because you didn’t label it as such.”

5. Don’t start your work experience with dates: To ensure applicant tracking systems read and import your work experience properly, always start it with your employer’s name, followed by your title, followed by the dates you held that title. (Each can run on its own line). Applicant tracking systems look for company names first, says Ciampi. Never start your work experience with the dates you held certain positions.

The whole article is worth reading, and can be found here.

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Refreshing job search advice

I came across 683 Way to Fail to Get a Job Offer, written by Mark Manson, and thought it was a refreshing change from the usual drab magazine job search advice that’s become ubiquitous in the past couple of years. The article details the selection and hiring process after the author posted a job ad for his company.

The best applications did the following:

  • They attached or linked to copies of their previous work for me to look at even though I didn’t ask for it.
  • They custom designed their application materials to match the design of my website and even used the same font on their resume.
  • They built entire WordPress sites to act as their application, with separate pages for their cover letter, resume, favorite books and so on.
  • They included lists of errors they had already found within my articles and suggested corrections.
  • They came up with design and illustration ideas to accompany my current articles without me asking.

If you’re creative, proactive, and a problem solver, then prove it. Send something I would want but didn’t ask for. Suggest improvements I never thought of. Write something that surprises me.

Read the full article here.

 

 

 

How I got hired: a lesson in never giving up

Looks like all the job hacking has finally paid off – I start a new full-time job next week! I won’t go into the details here (you can creep my LinkedIn profile if you’re really interested), but I’m glad to say it’s a great position in the Marketing & Communications department of a non-profit career and employment services agency. As you can imagine, I’m very excited and relieved. This has also given me some time to reflect on my job search since I was laid off, and analyze what went wrong and what went right with my job search technique and methodology.

I’m always curious as to how people with great jobs get hired, because it seems like such a one in a million chance. The answer is usually not as detailed as I’d like (“Oh, I just applied and they called me for an interview…”), so allow me to sperg out and explain to you, in excruciating detail, how I got hired. If you can learn from what I did right, and avoid what I did wrong, perhaps this will help you in your own job search, or at least make you feel more confident that you’re on the right path. For those who just want to jump straight to the point, skip down to my chart where I list what I did right, and where I went wrong.

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Send fewer resumes, get more interviews

Conventional job search wisdom tells us that we need to apply for as many jobs as possible in order to increase our chances of getting an interview. The job market is flooded with people looking for work, companies can afford to choose only the most highly qualified candidates, and job seekers need to pump out as many applications as possible to stay afloat in the murky waters of competition.

What if I had evidence that this conventional job wisdom was wrong? What if I told you that it’s possible to send out fewer resumes, and get more interviews? It may sound like a paradox, but fortunately I have some data from my own job search to back this up. This blog post will discuss the golden ratio of job applications (it exists, trust me…), and suggests an optimized job search methodology that will get you hired faster.

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Choosing metrics that matter: the Top Two KPIs for Job Hackers

I’ve mentioned before that I’ve been slowly absorbing ‘The Book’ on modern web analytics, Web Analytics 2.0 by Avinash Kaushik. It’s taking a while due to the depth and detail which the author goes into on the subject, while covering everything from how to choose a web analytics platform (perhaps slightly dated now – the book was published in 2010) to the intricacies of how platforms define and track individual metrics. Don’t be put off by the exhaustive detail; the major strength of the book is that it outlines a universal process for understanding and using web analytics instead of presenting a one size fits all formula to copy. In that spirit, lets use the process to identify and understand the best metrics to use for job hacking, and share some tips on avoiding common mistakes Job Hackers may encounter along the way.

To combat the overwhelming amount of data gathered in the old “track everything” mentality, modern analytics best practices has shifted to finding one or two metrics that best represent the overall performance of your business. These Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) will be different for each website and each business, depending on the business model you are operating on or the specific outcomes and goals you are hoping to achieve.

So which KPIs should Job Hackers use to measure the success of their portfolio. I have identified two…

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What I’ve learned from 30 days of job hacking

I started this blog just over a month ago today. Since then, I’ve really pushed myself to use all of the methods I’ve shared to improve my own job search in the hopes of starting the new year with lots of employment leads and interviews. So far, I’d have to say it’s been a success. Lets review the main ideas of job hacking, and see what I’ve learned from each:

1. Creating an online portfolio to showcase your work – I’ve had a portfolio for a while, but writing this blog encouraged me to kick things up a notch and go the extra mile with SEO optimization and tweaking my HTML and CSS code to make the site look and feel smooth and professional. Since my website is one page, I also added a Google Analytics event tracker that reports every time someone clicks a work sample on my portfolio. This was to offset the high bounce rate (% of people who leave page immediately) I was getting for all visitors, which is a common problem with one page websites or blogs. Most web analytics services rely on internal link clicks to track time on page, and since there are no internal links on a one page website when visitors exit the page the platform has no way of knowing how long the visit lasted. I’ll talk more about common issues with web analytics reporting and metrics in the future, but for now just know that a high bounce rate isn’t always indicative of visitors leaving your site immediately (a very bad thing indeed).

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Behold, the guts of my portfolio

2. Using UTM codes to track employer interest in your resume – This has been the most helpful and rewarding thing I’ve done, since I can now see exactly who is visiting my website. While not all visits result in an interview request, just knowing that my work is being considered is a huge psychological boost. Sending out applications and never hearing a thing back is one of the most frustrating things to deal with, and often leads to people feeling helpless and trapped. If you have any kind of online presence, start doing this already!

3. Segmenting your data to uncover job search insights – This has been the second most helpful technique I’ve learned, and has resulted in a greater understanding an appreciation of my Google Analytics dashboard and custom reporting. I’ve uncovered all kinds of weird tidbits of data, like the fact that I have a very dedicated fan in one of the international offices of a company that I applied to (but no call as of yet – don’t be shy anonymous fan!), or that most of my search traffic comes from the phrase “Ian Barnard design”, who is actually another dude in the UK who does amazing typography work. If I were selling a product, knowing the keywords that people were using to search for my website (even those that were sending bad traffic) would be a huge advantage. Sadly, the only product I’m only selling here is my skills…

4. Using A/B testing to perfect your resume and cover letter – The most difficult by far, mainly due to incomplete data. I can rig my applications to the hilt with UTM trackers, but it won’t stop someone who is reading my resume from just typing my URL directly into their browser, which will be logged as a direct visit. I have no way of knowing how many visitors are doing this, and it results in an incomplete data set which makes getting a sample size large enough to be statistically significant difficult. I still really like this idea though, and will work on ways to improve this – if anyone has any suggestions or tips, I’m all ears!


All in all, I’m very pleased with the results. I’m happy to report I’ve had interest and received calls from some great employers, and that these methods have proven to be a great way of showcasing my skills. Wish me luck for the coming weeks, and if you have any questions or want to chat about how these methods can help you in your job search, leave a comment or use the contact info on my portfolio.

I’d also like a give a quick thank-you to all the visitors and WordPress followers who’ve come to the blog in the past month! As of today (January 9, 2014) Job Hacking has had just under 150 visitors and 240 views, which is amazing. I’ve got some cool ideas to share in the near future, and I hope you continue to find the articles interesting and useful!